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   제목: Businesses beg for tariff relief as trade war with China rolls on


Businesses beg for tariff relief as trade war with China rolls on


By David J. Lynch

August 20,2018

The Trump administration is moving forward this week with plans to impose tariffs on a wider array of Chinese imports even as it explores the possibility of a negotiated resolution of its deepening trade conflict with China.

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office Monday began an extraordinary six days of public hearings on President Trump’s plans to tax an additional $200 billion in Chinese products. The latest tariff proposals, along with earlier levies on $50 billion in Chinese imports, would mean that by next month roughly half of everything American businesses import from China would confront special taxes.

Trump says the tariffs are a response to unfair Chinese trade practices, including forcing American companies to surrender their trade secrets to obtain access to the Chinese market and cyber theft of U.S. technology. Members of both parties and many industry groups agree that China is guilty of such violations. As the economic impact of the confrontation with China mounts, opponents are becoming more vocal in their opposition to the president’s chosen tariff remedy.


In the game of Trade Wars, perhaps the winning move is not to play. (Daron Taylor, Jhaan Elker/The Washington Post)

The planned escalation “dramatically expands the harm to American consumers, workers, businesses, and the economy,” the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in its prepared testimony.

At the USTR hearings, sporting goods manufacturers, candle makers, footwear companies, semiconductor producers and others will plead to be excluded from the next tariffs. More than 1,300 comments already have been filed in response to the president’s proposed action, most opposing the plan.




A paint brush maker in Newark warned the tariffs could make the hog bristles it buys from China too expensive, forcing it to cancel more than two dozen government contracts.

“If this tariff is enacted, the impact on my small company and its 20 employees will be devastating,” wrote Arthur Edelson, president of Spectrum Paint Applicator. “I would be put out of business immediately without question.

On Wednesday, U.S. and Chinese officials are scheduled to meet for the first time in two months to discuss potential solutions to the commercial standoff. The U.S. delegation is led by David Malpass, undersecretary of the treasury for international affairs, while China’s team is headed by Wang Shouwen, vice minister of commerce.

There is little expectation the meetings will produce a breakthrough. Neither official has full authority to make a deal, and earlier rounds of talks led by more senior officials made little progress.




In March, Malpass was forced to backpedal after telling a conference of bankers in Buenos Aires he had “discontinued” an official economic dialogue with Beijing. After the Treasury Department publicly contradicted him, he said he had “misspoke.”

While some Chinese officials have expressed concern about their slowing economy and many Republicans in Congress are worried the trade war could cost them votes in November, neither country appears prepared to back down.

So far, the United States has imposed tariffs on $34 billion in Chinese products; levies on a further $16 billion in products are scheduled to take effect on Thursday. China has retaliated against an equivalent amount of U.S. goods.

Selected articles from The Washington Post.
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